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A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.
A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.
The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.
Key Tips
If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!
A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.
A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.
The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.
Key Tips
If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!
A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.
A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.
The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.
Key Tips
If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!
A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.
A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.
The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.
Key Tips
If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!
A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.
A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.
The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.
Key Tips
If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!

A hidden gem of a province, Nan was once an independent kingdom and is now a refuge for travelers who wish to explore the natural beauty of northern Thailand and its rich cultural heritage in peace and tranquility.

A quiet and tranquil province, Nan is nestled in a verdant valley in northern Thailand along the border with Laos. Because of its relative proximity to Luang Prabang, the historical capital of the Laotian Lan Xang kingdom, the earliest settlers in the area were Lan Xang’s Laotians, ethnic Tai who are distantly related to the Tai people who settled in central Thailand. These early settlers established themselves around present-day Pua district, which is rich in rock salt deposits, about 700 years ago. The earliest Nan rulers allied themselves with neighboring principalities to establish the kingdom of Lan Na. The center of power in Nan eventually moved south to the fertile Nan River basin, where the capital of Nan exists to this day. Nan’s history, development, and architecture were greatly influenced by various neighboring kingdoms, in particular Sukhothai, which played important political and religious roles in shaping the development of Nan. Over the centuries however, Nan alternated between being an independent principality under the control of Lan Na, Sukhothai, Burma and Siam in that order. In 1558, the town was conquered and depopulated by the Burmese. By the late 18th century Nan forged an alliance with the new Bangkok centered Rattakosin Kingdom and existed as a semi-autonomous kingdom with a line of monarchs that ruled from 1786 until 1931. Today, Nan is still the home of numerous Thai Lue and other hill tribes who retain many of their fascinating customs and traditions.

The rural province of Nan is an attractive region of northern Thailand where there are high populations of hill tribe communities, including Hmong, N’tin, and Khamu. Much of Nan is devoted to agriculture, particularly rice and fruit cultivation.Nan features six national parks, including the stunning Doi Phukha National Park, which contains mountains nearly 2,000 m high. The rich natural beauty of Nan makes it an ideal destination for trekking as the remote province sees far fewer visitors than neighboring Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai. The provincial capital of Nan has a relaxed charm, an interesting history, some impressive temples, and a good museum. There are also a number of quality restaurants and bars along the town’s riverfront to plan your adventures into the countryside or relax after sightseeing in the town.

Key Tips
  • If you plan to visit in October, the city comes alive for the annual Nan boat races; try to book your room early!

Good morning to you! Sukjai is now finding camping equipment for a coming rainy season trip! Sukjai is going to Tak Province, to the magnificent Thi Lo Su Waterfall!

The Thi Lo Su Waterfall is located in Umphang Wildlife Sanctuary in Tak Province. The waterfall lies on a 300-meter-high escarpment. The word Thi Lo Su is from the Karen language meaning ‘the great waterfall’. Sukjai heard that this waterfall is among the most beautiful waterfalls in Thailand and is considered by many people to be the one destination that you should visit in your lifetime!

The water here is crystal clear, especially during the rainy season, approximately from June to August. Sukjai recommends this period if you are planning on visiting Thi Lo Su. For your stay at Thi Lo Su, you can choose to either relish in the luxury resorts around here or be embraced by the pure nature by camping at the camping site, but on one condition: you need to walk here. No transportation provided! It is highly recommended that you check a proper visit time with the staff prior to your arrival since the sanctuary is close from time to time in order to allow the environment to recover and let the wild animals out for hunting and breed without being disturbed.

If you have a chance to visit Thi Lo Su Waterfall, be sure to keep yourself strong and in good health, because you need to climb up a number of steep and rough paths to get to the destination. And most importantly, abide by the rules and obey the sanctuary staff for your own safety! Look at these wonderful photos as you plan for your own trip! Bye bye!

One of the hottest beach-resort destinations in Thailand, Pattaya may not be idyllic but it certainly makes up for it with a wide variety of activities, accommodation, and nightlife venues.
Pattaya is a lively beach town that draws visitors from around the world. With activities that include a wide array of water sports, golf, shopping, cabaret shows, an elephant village, and a Ripley’s Believe it or Not museum (to name only a very few) it’s impossible not to have an action-packed Pattaya holiday. Unless of course its relaxation you crave, in which case there are thousands of beach chairs and umbrellas lining the Pattaya shore, where wandering vendors will cater to your every need: from barbequed shrimp to a foot massage. Pattaya is certainly a Thai beach resort that meets the needs of any visitor on any budget.

Experience the new face of Amazing Thailand Application with astonishing new designs, packed with complete info of wonderful Thailand’s destinations, events, promotions plus impressive new features such as Augmented Reality, QR Scanner, and Check-in capability. Start to embark on your superb journey through a new distinctive way now! http://bit.ly/Lf9sFB

 What an amazing place this is! How wonderful would it be to be together. This video is our first episode, keep watching for the next place!

“Wish you were here.”

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